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Showing posts from November, 2015

Enterprise Security: The wood for the trees?

We have been talking a fair bit over the past few years on what we consider to be some of the big, hidden challenges of information security [ 1 ][ 2 ][ 3 ]. We figured it would be useful to highlight one of them in particular: focusing on the right things . As infosec creeps past its teenage years we've found ourselves with a number of accepted truths and best practices. These were well intentioned and may hold some value (to some orgs), but can often be misleading and dangerous. We have seen companies with huge security teams, spending tens, to hundreds of millions of dollars on information security, burning time, money and manpower on best practices that don't significantly improve the security posture of their organization. These companies invest in the latest products, attend the hottest conferences and look to hire smart people. They have dashboards tracking "key performance areas" (and some of them might even be in the green) but they still wouldn't hold

Stripping encryption from Microsoft SQL Server authentication

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"Communication flow in the TDS 4.2 protocol" [ msdn ] Our recent PyConZA talk had several examples of why Python is often an easy choice of language for us to quickly try things out. One example came from looking at network traffic of a client authenticating with Microsoft SQL Server (in order to simulate the server later). By default, we can't see what the authentication protocol looks like on the wire because the traffic is encrypted. This post is a brief account of stripping that encryption with a little help from Python's Twisted framework. The clean  overview  of the authentication protocol on MSDN suggests that it would as easily readable as its diagram. Our first packet captures weren't as enlightening. Only the initial connection request messages from the client and server were readable. Viewing the traffic in Wireshark showed several further messages without a hint that the payloads were encrypted. A clearer hint was in the  MSDN description