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Showing posts from May, 2016

Slack[ing] off our notifications

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We :heart: Slack. The elderly in our team were IRC die hards, but Slack even won them over (if for no other reason, for their awesome iOS changelogs ) . Thanks to Slack integrations, its robust API and webhooks, we have data from all over filter into our Slack, from exception reporting to sales enquiries. If it’s something we need to know, we have it pushed through to Slack. At the same time, our Canary product (which prides itself on helping you “Know. When it matters”) was able to push out alerts via email, sms or over it’s RESTful API. Canaries are designed from the ground up to not be loquacious. I.e They don’t talk much, but when they do, you probably should pay attention. Having them pipe their results into Slack seemed a no-brainer. Our initial stab at this was simple: By allowing a user to enter the URL for a webhook in their Console, we could send events through to the Slack channel of their choosing. Of course, this wasn’t all that was needed to this g

Certified Canarytokens: Alerts from signed Windows binaries and Office documents

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As part of a talk at the ITWeb Security Summit last week, we discussed how to trigger email alerts when file signatures are validated with our Canarytokens project. Building on that alerting primitive, we can make signed executables that alert when run or signed Office documents that alert when opened.  Canarytokens is our exploration of light-weight ways to detect when something bad has happened on the inside a network. (It’s not at all concerned with leaks in that dubious non-existing line referred to as “the perimeter” of a network.) We built an extensible server for receiving alerts from passive tokens that are left lying around. Tokens are our units of alerts. When a token URL link is fetched or a token DNS name is queried this triggers an alert via the Canarytokens server. With these (and other tokens) we set out to build alerts for more significant incidents. Office Document Signatures A security researcher, Alexey Tyurin , drew our attention to how open