Making NGINX slightly less “surprising”

Dan Geer famously declared that security is “the absence of unmitigatable surprise”. He said it while discussing how dependence is the root source of risk, where increasing system dependencies change the nature of surprises that emanate from composed systems.  Recently, two of our servers “surprised” us due to an unexpected dependence, and we thought this incident was worth talking about. (We also discuss how to mitigate such surprises going forward). Background:Every Canary deployment is made up of at least two

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They see me rolling (back)

Moving backward is a feature too! We go through a lot of pain to make sure that Canary deployments are quick and painless. It’s worth remembering that even though the deployment happened in minutes, a bunch of stuff has happened in the background. (Your bird created a crypto key-pair, exchanged the public key with your console, and registered itself as one of your birds). From that point on, all communication between your bird and your console is encrypted (with a

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Using the Linux Audit System to detect badness

Security vendors have a mediocre track record in keeping their own applications and infrastructure safe. As a security product company, we need to make sure that we don’t get compromised. But we also need to plan for the horrible event that a customer console is compromised, at which point the goal is to quickly detect the breach. This post talks about how we use Linux’s Audit System (LAS) along with ELK (Elasticsearch, Logstash, and Kibana) to help us achieve this

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Get notifications when someone accesses your Google Documents (aka: having fun with Google Apps Script)

Our MS Word and PDF tokens are a great way to see if anyone is snooping through your documents. One simply places the document in an enticing location and waits. If the document is opened, a notification (containing useful information about the viewer) is sent to you. Both MS Word tokens and PDF tokens work by embedding a link to a resource in the tokened document. When the document is opened an attempt to fetch the resource is made. This

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Introducing our Python API Wrapper

Introducing our Python API Wrapper With our shiny new Python API wrapper, managing your deployed Canaries has never been simpler. With just a few simple lines of code you’ll be able to sort and store incident data, reboot all of your devices, create Canarytokens, and much more (Building URLs correctly and parsing JSON strings is for the birds…). So, how do you get started? Firstly you’ll need to install our package. You can grab it from a number of places:

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Chrome Extension for gpg in Gmail

Last month we released an alpha version of cr-gpg. This is a simple Chrome extension to enable gpg functionality in gmail (or Apps for Domains). (If you don’t know what gpg is, you should first read this and this.) Installation : You can grab the extension from [here] and a double click should install it , after the install is completed you should see the image above if you navigate to chrome://extensions : Options : Once you have installed the

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Simple Graphs with Arbor.js

We recently released a tool at http://cc.thinkst.com to capture and collect infosec conference details. We commented on it [here]. One of the cooler components of it, is the ability to view the relationships between speakers/researchers who have collaborated. This post is a quick introduction to the library we used to build our graphs, with enough info to get you up and running in minutes. As I mentioned, we use ArborJS library which is a a graph visualization library using web

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