Blog Posts

Farseeing: a look at BeyondCorp

This is the third post in a series highlighting bits from our recent BlackHat USA 2017 talk. An index of all the posts in the series is here. Introduction In our BlackHat talk, “Fighting the Previous War“, we showed how attacks against cloud services and cloud-native companies are still in their nascent stages of evolution. The number of known attacks against AWS is small, which is at odds with the huge number (and complexity) of services available. It’s not a

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Disrupting AWS S3 Logging

This post continues the series of highlights from our recent BlackHat USA 2017 talk. An index of all the posts in the series is here. Introduction Before today’s public clouds, best practice was to store logs separately from the host that generated them. If the host was compromised, the logs stored off it would have a better chance of being preserved. At a cloud provider like AWS, a storage service within an account holds your activity logs. A sufficiently thorough

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All your devs are belong to us: how to backdoor the Atom editor

This is the first post in a series highlighting bits from our recent BlackHat USA 2017 talk. An index of all the posts in the series is here. Introduction In this post we’ll be looking at ways to compromise your developers that you probably aren’t defending against, by exploiting the plugins in their editors. We will therefore be exploring Atom, Atom plugins, how they work and the security shortfalls they expose.Targeting developers seems like a good idea (targeting sysadmins is so 2014).

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BlackHat 2017 Series

[Update: jump to the end of the page for the series index] Late July found Haroon and I sweating buckets inside an 8th storey Las Vegas hotel room. Our perspiration was due not to the malevolent heat outside but to the 189 slides we were building for BlackHat 2017. Modifications to the slidedeck continued until just before the talk, and we’re now posting a link to the final deck. Spoiler alert: it’s at the bottom of this post. A few years

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A guide to Birding (aka: Tips for deploying Canaries)

Heres a quick, informal guide to deploying birds. It isn’t a Canary user guide and should: be a fun read; be broadly applicable. One of Canary’s core benefits is that they are quick to deploy (Under 5 minutes from the moment you unbox them) but this guide should seed some ideas for using them to maximum effect. Grab the Guide Here (No registration, No Tracking Link, No Unnecessary Drama) If you have thoughts, comments, or ideas, hit us back at

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Get notifications when someone accesses your Google Documents (aka: having fun with Google Apps Script)

Our MS Word and PDF tokens are a great way to see if anyone is snooping through your documents. One simply places the document in an enticing location and waits. If the document is opened, a notification (containing useful information about the viewer) is sent to you. Both MS Word tokens and PDF tokens work by embedding a link to a resource in the tokened document. When the document is opened an attempt to fetch the resource is made. This

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Introducing our Python API Wrapper

Introducing our Python API Wrapper With our shiny new Python API wrapper, managing your deployed Canaries has never been simpler. With just a few simple lines of code you’ll be able to sort and store incident data, reboot all of your devices, create Canarytokens, and much more (Building URLs correctly and parsing JSON strings is for the birds…). So, how do you get started? Firstly you’ll need to install our package. You can grab it from a number of places:

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Cloud Canary Beta

We are sorry that this blog has been so quiet lately. Our Canary product took off like a rocket and we’ve had our heads down giving it our all. This month we released version-2 with a bunch of new features. You really should check it out. Since almost day one, customers have been asking for virtual Canaries.  We generally prefer doing one thing really well over doing multiple things “kinda ok”, so we held off virtualising Canary for a long

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Slack[ing] off our notifications

We :heart: Slack. The elderly in our team were IRC die hards, but Slack even won them over (if for no other reason, for their awesome iOS changelogs).   Thanks to Slack integrations, its robust API and webhooks, we have data from all over filter into our Slack, from exception reporting to sales enquiries. If it’s something we need to know, we have it pushed through to Slack.   At the same time, our Canary product (which prides itself on

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Certified Canarytokens: Alerts from signed Windows binaries and Office documents

As part of a talk at the ITWeb Security Summit last week, we discussed how to trigger email alerts when file signatures are validated with our Canarytokens project. Building on that alerting primitive, we can make signed executables that alert when run or signed Office documents that alert when opened.  Canarytokens is our exploration of light-weight ways to detect when something bad has happened on the inside a network. (It’s not at all concerned with leaks in that dubious non-existing

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